To my dad, Richard Zevin, who knows everything Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether tha. Generated using the Power Tab Editor by Brad Larsen. http://powertab. goudzwaard.info ALL THESE THINGS THAT I'VE DONE. As recorded by The Killers. The Killers - All These Things That I'Ve Done - Download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online.

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All These Things Ive Done Pdf

Print and download in PDF or MIDI All These Things That I've Done. Transcription of "All These Things That I've Done" by The Killers. I do not. online All These Things Ive Done pdf (ePUB) book. The first edition These Things That I've Done (Official Music Video) The Killers - All These Things That Ive. The Killers - All These Things That I've Done Lyrics Lyrics to "All These Things That I've Done" song by The Killers: When there's nowhere else to run Is.

If you own the copyright to this book and it is wrongfully on our website, we offer a simple DMCA procedure to remove your content from our site. Start by pressing the button below! Not in the distant or semidistant future either. Right then. Boys like my father, I guess.

The iron ball in my stomach shifts and I sprint across the hall to the bathroom, shutting the door behind me. Then I lean over the toilet bowl and retch. My first order of business the next morning is to check in with Mrs. Dover, my guidance counselor. More reentry cushioning. I get to school early but not early enough, as there are several people hanging out in the lobby, talking and laughing and taking selfies with their phones. I slip by and head into the main office, where I tell the receptionist that Mrs.

Dover is expecting me. She waves me through. When she does, she smiles. Unlike Mr. Dover and I already know each other; she used to teach freshman English and I was in her class. Everyone does. Boys trip over themselves when Mrs. Dover passes by. Or at least they used to, back in freshman and sophomore year. I have no idea what changed around here while I was away.

I notice that my foot is tapping against the carpeted floor, so I shift my weight onto it, forcing it still. Dover moves back behind her desk and motions me to the chair across from her. I handed Natty my pocket handkerchief and told her to blow her nose. At this point, the would-be mugger had started to cry, too. Then he yelled an obscene name at me and disappeared into the park. Natty gave me her hand, and we walked in silence until we were in the relative safety of Fifth Avenue.

I could barely hear her above the city noise. Same black hair. Same blue eyes. Except for Nana. At least Leo would be happy. Macaroni and cheese was his favorite. I went to knock on his door to tell him the good news. There was no answer, so I opened it. He should have been home from his part-time job at the veterinary clinic for at least two hours, but his room was empty aside from his collection of stuffed lions. The lions looked at me questioningly with their dull plastic eyes.

She was asleep, but I woke her up anyway. You scared me, devochka. I was wondering if he said he was going anywhere. Clearly, Nana was having one of her less cogent days. Nana considered this for about a million years. I lose track of time. She laughed and pointed to the cheap pink carnations that were sitting in a shallowly filled vase on the windowsill.

I could see that her eyelids had begun to flutter shut. I squeezed her hand. He might be nineteen, three years my senior, but he was and would always be my responsibility. Not long before my father was killed, Daddy made me promise that if anything ever happened to him, I would take care of Leo. We must do everything we can to protect him. Smart, the spitting image of Daddy, and best of all, the firstborn son.

Daddy had even given him his name. Leo was actually Leonyd Balanchine, Jr. The year Leo was nine, he and my mother had been driving out to Long Island to visit my maternal grandmother. My sister and I ages two and six had strep throat and had to stay behind. The hit had been meant for Daddy, of course. My mother was killed instantly. Two shots through the windshield and straight through her lovely forehead and honey-scented chestnut curls.

Or read. Or walk. My father had him sent to the best rehabilitation center followed by the best school for learning disabilities.

And Leo certainly got a lot better, but he would never be the same. They said my brother was lucky. And he was. Though I knew his limitations frustrated him, Leo managed a lot with the intellect he had. He had a job where everyone thought he was a hard worker, and he was a good brother to Natty and me. When Nana died, Leo would become our guardian—just until I turned eighteen. I had added the cheese sauce and was considering calling the cops for all the good that would do when I heard the front door open.

Leo bounded into the kitchen. I was crazy worried. I was with our family. You said it was okay as long as I was with family. Immediate family. Is that the only person you were with? We went to his place. Fats was fat, which was less common in those days. Fats closed his place, and we went out for it.

Jacks had … What do you call it, Annie? I took a deep breath and tried to control myself. It was one thing to lose my temper with Gable Arsley but behaving that way around Leo was completely unacceptable. I guess they got the space on the cheap. But Jacks said that a lot of people wanted to meet me there. The macaroni had cooled enough to be eaten so I began to serve it into bowls. You know, in the family business.

Still, I knew it was no good getting mad at my brother. Not to mention, it seemed excessive to commit two violent acts with pasta in the same day. You love working at the clinic. Now, go get Natty, okay? And maybe we made too much of his handicaps. The last part terrified me, of course. Grownups could get themselves in trouble. They could get taken advantage of. They could get sent to Rikers Island, or worse: they could end up dead. As I filled glasses with water, I wondered what my padonki half cousin was up to and how much of a problem this was going to be for me.

I would rather have just served my time in a completely zoned-out state. Though several replies did occur to me, I smiled and said nothing. Scarlet had moved and was now sitting with Win. She was leaning toward him across the table, and laughing at something he said. Poor Scarlet. I smelled like cafeteria fumes and garbage. Scarlet beckoned to me. Over here! The smock, too. I started eating the vegetable potpie in what I hoped was a somewhat ladylike fashion. Even though I was sick of smelling the stuff, I was still famished.

As the bell rang, Win and Scarlet left, and I concentrated on speed-eating. I noticed that Win had forgotten his hat on the table. Just as the second bell rang, Win returned to the cafeteria. I held out the hat to him. He was about to leave but then he sat down in the chair across from me. If there was one thing my dad had taught me, it was the importance of loyalty. It was high time for Win to be on his way. He removed the hairnet from my hair, his thumb gently grazing my forehead, and my curls spilled out.

I felt myself blush and so I ordered myself to stop blushing. This flirtation was starting to annoy me. Things must have been pretty bad for them to have brought in someone from Albany. An outside hire implied a major regime change. Possibly incompetent and a thief. Basically a magician who grows crops without water.

My father used to be the Albany DA, though. And I apologize if I misled you in any way. I was already five minutes late for Twentieth-Century American History. On the board, Mr. Beery said. I had lunch duty. Balanchine provides us with a walking example of the societal problems of crime, punishment, and recidivism. And now, boys and girls, can anyone tell me what the Noble Experiment refers to? I like to think of us as being in discussion. Beery proclaimed.

For the rest of the period, he lectured about Prohibition. How temperance people believed that banning alcohol would magically solve everything that was wrong with society: poverty, violence, crime, etc. Alcohol had been a pawn. Daddy had always told me that there was nothing inherently evil about chocolate, that it had gotten caught up in a larger whirlwind involving food, drugs, health, and money.

Our country had only chosen chocolate because the people in power needed to pick something, and chocolate was what they could live without. Beery calling my name. Balanchine, care to weigh in on the reason the Noble Experiment ultimately failed? Beery lied.

A bit more, though. Something from your personal experience perhaps. People will always find a way to get what they want, and there will always be criminals willing to provide it. I was glad to be out of there. Beery called to me. I rolled my eyes at both of them. She winked in a ridiculous and cartoonish way that contorted half her face. I have to stake my claim before someone else does.

Scarlet was coming over to study as she often did. Scarlet and Natty went into my bedroom while I checked on Nana. It was remarked that the clock began to strike, and I began to cry, simultaneously.

She held up the paper novel so that I could see the title: David Copperfield. I walked over to her and kissed her cheek. But this was what she had. I took the book from Imogen and held it up to my face. The dust stung my nose. The aroma was salty and a bit sour. The cover of the book was disintegrating. Nana once told me that when she was a girl there used to be huge stores filled with paper books. All the paper books had been pulped and recycled into essentials like toilet tissue and money.

By the way, one of the goods the Balanchine semya dealt in was black market paper. Why would a person want all those dirty paper carcasses around? Still, the books had value for her, so I knew it was a sign of respect that she would offer one of them to me. I shook my head. I have a ton of reading for school. He could stand for some male companionship in his life.

Jakov Pirozhki is not exactly trustworthy. And family takes care of family. Besides, Fats, at least, seems a decent enough sort. Well, there have certainly been made men that were far more simpleminded than Leo.

He was of my generation. Six feet ten inches, three hundred and fifty pounds. Would have been one hell of a football player, if he could have remembered the rules.

The other guys called him Viktor the Mule to his face and the Donkey behind his back. Nana was making some sense.

For the first time since Leo had gone missing, I felt my stomach muscles unclench a little. Bled to death. A real shame. My brother was tall, but he was thin as paper. Besides, Leo would never leave the clinic. He loves the animals too much. I went into her closet. I pushed past the coats to open the safe. I moved the gun out of the way. I took a chocolate bar: Balanchine Special Dark.

I put the gun back. I closed the safe. I went back into her bedroom. She was already fast asleep. Take the Colt instead. She smiled. You can ask her tomorrow. His door was shut but I could see light coming from the crack at the bottom.

I looked at my watch: , slightly early for my brother to be back from work. I knocked on the door. No answer. I knocked again. Still no answer. I put my ear against the wood.

I could barely make out muffled sobs. You know I can. Leo unlocked and opened the door. His eyes were bloodshot, and trails of snot were coming out his nose. When he cried, my brother looked about six years old. I put my arms around him, which made Leo cry even harder.

Is it something with Jacks? After perhaps thirty more seconds of tears, Leo managed to tell me the cause of his distress. When he had calmed down somewhat, I asked him to explain what had happened. It turned out that the veterinary clinic had been shut down.

The clinic had been cited for fifty-one violations, most of them having to do with cleanliness, and had been ordered to immediately cease operations. It was my job to keep it clean, and I do a good job. This sort of thing happened every day. Some people still thought nonworking animals were a waste of our limited resources. Pikarski, to see if there was anything I could do to help. I turned off his light and closed the door.

Things must have been pretty bad for them to have brought in someone from Albany. An outside hire implied a major regime change. Possibly incompetent and a thief. Basically a magician who grows crops without water. My father used to be the Albany DA, though. And I apologize if I misled you in any way. I was already five minutes late for Twentieth-Century American History. On the board, Mr. Beery said. I had lunch duty.

Balanchine provides us with a walking example of the societal problems of crime, punishment, and recidivism. And now, boys and girls, can anyone tell me what the Noble Experiment refers to? I like to think of us as being in discussion. Beery proclaimed. For the rest of the period, he lectured about Prohibition.

How temperance people believed that banning alcohol would magically solve everything that was wrong with society: Alcohol had been a pawn. Daddy had always told me that there was nothing inherently evil about chocolate, that it had gotten caught up in a larger whirlwind involving food, drugs, health, and money.

Our country had only chosen chocolate because the people in power needed to pick something, and chocolate was what they could live without. Beery calling my name.

Balanchine, care to weigh in on the reason the Noble Experiment ultimately failed? Beery lied. A bit more, though.

Something from your personal experience perhaps. People will always find a way to get what they want, and there will always be criminals willing to provide it. I was glad to be out of there. Beery called to me. I rolled my eyes at both of them. She winked in a ridiculous and cartoonish way that contorted half her face.

I have to stake my claim before someone else does. Scarlet was coming over to study as she often did. Scarlet and Natty went into my bedroom while I checked on Nana. It was remarked that the clock began to strike, and I began to cry, simultaneously. She held up the paper novel so that I could see the title: David Copperfield.

I walked over to her and kissed her cheek. But this was what she had. I took the book from Imogen and held it up to my face. The dust stung my nose.

The aroma was salty and a bit sour. The cover of the book was disintegrating. Nana once told me that when she was a girl there used to be huge stores filled with paper books. All the paper books had been pulped and recycled into essentials like toilet tissue and money. By the way, one of the goods the Balanchine semya dealt in was black market paper. Why would a person want all those dirty paper carcasses around?

Still, the books had value for her, so I knew it was a sign of respect that she would offer one of them to me. I shook my head. I have a ton of reading for school.

He could stand for some male companionship in his life. Jakov Pirozhki is not exactly trustworthy. And family takes care of family. Besides, Fats, at least, seems a decent enough sort. Well, there have certainly been made men that were far more simpleminded than Leo.

All These Things That I've Done sheet music for Piano, Cello download free in PDF or MIDI

He was of my generation. Six feet ten inches, three hundred and fifty pounds. Would have been one hell of a football player, if he could have remembered the rules. The other guys called him Viktor the Mule to his face and the Donkey behind his back. Nana was making some sense. For the first time since Leo had gone missing, I felt my stomach muscles unclench a little. Bled to death. A real shame.

My brother was tall, but he was thin as paper. Besides, Leo would never leave the clinic. He loves the animals too much. I went into her closet. I pushed past the coats to open the safe. I moved the gun out of the way. I took a chocolate bar: Balanchine Special Dark. I put the gun back. I closed the safe. I went back into her bedroom. She was already fast asleep. Take the Colt instead. She smiled. You can ask her tomorrow.

His door was shut but I could see light coming from the crack at the bottom. I looked at my watch: I knocked on the door.

No answer. I knocked again. Still no answer. I put my ear against the wood. I could barely make out muffled sobs. You know I can. Leo unlocked and opened the door. His eyes were bloodshot, and trails of snot were coming out his nose. When he cried, my brother looked about six years old. I put my arms around him, which made Leo cry even harder. Is it something with Jacks? After perhaps thirty more seconds of tears, Leo managed to tell me the cause of his distress. When he had calmed down somewhat, I asked him to explain what had happened.

It turned out that the veterinary clinic had been shut down. The clinic had been cited for fifty-one violations, most of them having to do with cleanliness, and had been ordered to immediately cease operations. It was my job to keep it clean, and I do a good job. This sort of thing happened every day. Some people still thought nonworking animals were a waste of our limited resources. Pikarski, to see if there was anything I could do to help.

I turned off his light and closed the door. When I got back to my room, Natty and Scarlet were monopolizing the space on the bed.

Scarlet ignored me and held out her hand, which was where the list was written: Little Egypt 2. The Times 4. Co … Scarlet had sweated off half of number five. Yeah, that was kind of lame anyway. The same was true for Natty.

Natty stood up. I sat down at my desk and took out my slate. You should tell Scarlet that you like Win. I turned to look at my sister. Mostly, you end up with dummies like Gable. And Win likes you which is practically a miracle.

Romance was a complete waste anyway. My mother had felt romantic about my father, and look where that got her—dead at thirty-eight. I was about to start my homework when I remembered that I needed to call Dr. Pikarski for Leo. I picked up the phone. I dialed Dr. I liked her. I had spoken to her several times in the process of securing the position at the clinic for Leo in the first place, and she had always been straight with me.

I felt like I owed her one. Her voice was clearly stressed when she answered the phone. The guy from the DOH seemed to have it in for us!

Pikarski for the name of the DOH employee. After I hung up with Dr. Two phone calls in one day! My father told me that I could always count on Mr. Yoric a check? Kipling asked after I had explained the situation. It was just a term of art. I have no plans to literally cut anyone at the Department of Health a check. And tell Leo to hold tight, too. Kipling asked. I groaned. Leo, Senior, I mean. Kipling had gone to high school with Daddy. Kipling what he knew about Jakov Pirozhki.

No one in the organization really takes him seriously, especially his own father. I pity the kid to tell you the truth. Kipling changed the subject.

Talking to Mr. Kipling always managed to make me feel less lonely and more alone at the same time. I sometimes imagined that Mr. Kipling was my father. I imagined what it would be like to have a father who had a respectable profession like a lawyer. I imagined what it would be like to have the kind of father who took you on college tours. The kind of father who was still alive.

Even before Daddy died, I sometimes imagined asking Mr. Kipling to adopt me. But Mr. Kipling already had a daughter. Her name was Grace and she was studying to be an engineer. It was Leo. He, like everyone in the Balanchine family, had been born into the Eastern Orthodox faith.

I certainly never heard him mention God. My mother was the Catholic, and she talked about God regularly. Actually, she said she talked to Him. But my point is, I was a Catholic because of my mother. It was my mother and what she would have wanted. And when the worn velvet brushed my knees in the confessional, I knew she had felt the same thing.

And there was nowhere else in my life that this even came near to happening. For this reason, I knew I could never entirely walk away from the Catholic faith. So what if I would be a virgin until I was married? Gable had never even had a chance. Bribery, wrath, a few repeats from Monday, etc. I was assigned another minor penance, which I accomplished in time to make it to first period: Forensic Science II.

I had inherited my aptitude. It was my second year having Dr. Fifties or sixties. Even if it was a week-old chicken corpse or an ominously stained mattress or a menstrual pad. Lau announced gleefully. Who wants to be odd person out? It might seem weird but I actually liked working with the evidence by myself. The assignment was pretty straightforward. Using only the teeth, we were to come up with a detailed profile of the person in life e.

I put on a fresh pair of rubber gloves and began to contemplate my teeth. They were small and white. No fillings. A bit of asymmetric wear on the right molar as if the person had ground his or her teeth in sleep.

All These Things That I've Done

I noted my findings on my slate: Almost could have been describing myself. Lau put a hand on my shoulder. We found a partner for you, Annie. I showed him my slate screen. I like to spend time thinking at the beginning. He put on a pair of gloves, a gesture I appreciated in a potential lab partner, then he pointed to the backs of her bottom teeth.

He lowered his head so that he was eye to teeth. Our girl was making herself sick. But I knew what he meant without having to ask. All these teeth had once been in real, live people.

They had talked and smiled and eaten and sang and cursed and prayed. They had brushed and flossed and died. In English class, we read poems about death, but here, right in front of me, was a poem about death, too. Only this poem was true. Evidence did. Pretty early for such deep thoughts. I wondered if Win had ever had someone close to him die. The bell rang. I slipped my slate into my bag. The sport was kind of ridiculous when it came down to it.

Scarlet was my fencing partner and, though she filled out the outfit nicely, she and I were equally clueless fencers. The thing was, she could actually strike a series of plausible offensive poses, and I had the knack for striking appropriate, corresponding defensive postures. After warm-ups, which included lunging and stretching, we broke off into pairs.

Scarlet and I fenced sort of and talked mostly. Then I staggered several steps backward. I launched my foil into her hip. I unloaded the trays onto the dishcleaning belt at which point the head lunch lady gave me permission to eat my own lunch. I know it was just lunch duty but I was still glad that she thought I had done a good job. Scarlet was sitting with Win and several of her friends from the drama club.

I sat down next to Scarlet and said my line. There used to be a collection of Egyptian stuff there, which is why they call it Little Egypt. They were a modest but steady source of revenue for the government, which was usually on the verge of a total financial collapse. Scarlet and I had prepared for such a response. He smiled. Scarlet laughed. I could tell she was about to have her way with Win. We arranged to meet at my apartment—it was the closest to the club—that night at eight.

I told myself not to worry, that there was probably a simple explanation for his absence. Three fresh pink carnations sat in the vase on the windowsill: Nana had had a visitor. I waved to Imogen. She put her finger to her lips to indicate that I should be quiet. Not that I ever had been. Draping her book over the worn arm of the burgundy chair, she rose and closed the door gently behind her.

I asked her if she knew where Leo was. Galina had a rough afternoon. The Pool. Also, I did have school to attend. I was about to head across town to claim Leo when he came through the door. He was out of breath and flushed. Leo gave me a hug. He was damp with sweat, and I pushed him away. It was a game with him. I love you. I love you already! Now tell me where you were. I was out getting a new job!

Just until they reopen the clinic. I cleared my throat. Cleaning the floors and stuff. You know I am. This explained the fresh carnations. Jacks had been surprised to find Leo home in the middle of the day so Leo had told him the story of the clinic getting shut down. Were those his exact words? I know what our family does. I know what Daddy used to do, too. I got hurt because of what Daddy used to do, remember?

I know it every day. And Cousin Jacks is a real nice guy, Annie. Nice Cousin Jacks had gotten wasted and put his hand on my boob. Nothing to mishear there. Even though he was wiry, his arms were muscular from all the lifting they had him do at the clinic. He looked capable. Powerful, even.

Not like someone who needed to be protected. Certainly not like someone whose little sister lay awake in bed worrying about him. They were looking at me with hope.

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As I stepped over the threshold, Leo slammed the door behind me. There was a good chance the ruckus had roused Nana, so I went back to her room. She was indeed awake. It was the end of her workday anyway. Sleep well, Galina. Nana laughed, which made her cough. I poured her some water, then held the straw to her lips. A few drops spilled out onto the maroon silk coverlet and to my eye these looked almost like blood. I repeated the question.

Jacks is family. Leo is without a job. Family takes care of family. Not everything is conspiracy. I used to always have to say that to your father, too. Nana continued. No one would bother with him. I can see your furrowed brow. I only meant no one will shoot your brother or get him in any kind of trouble.

And one of the best things about your father, God rest his soul, was that he took care of people. They loved your father, and they respected him in life, and they do what they can to honor him in death. This is the reason Jacks finds a job for your brother. If you go down there, it will only humiliate Leo. He will lose face in front of the other men. And besides, Pirozhki himself is a nobody, and no threat to anybody.

Nana shook her head. Let him be a man, my darling. Give him that gift. I could barely hear him through the wood. I was just worried before.

His eyes filled with tears. I stood on my tiptoes so that I could stroke his back. I handed him the bowl, and he started scooping the yellow tubes into his mouth. They need you. He set the bowl on the floor, picked me up, and spun me around the way our father used to. Put me down! The one time you went, you said how noisy it was. You got a migraine and had to leave after five minutes. Not tonight. Just Scarlet and me. He turned to look out the window.

All These Things That I've Done by the Killers

Maybe he was right. Maybe it was a little bit that. But only a very little bit. Leo was silent. I picked up my tweezers and plucked a stray hair from my eyebrow. The doorbell rang. The gargoyles out front. A million apologies. I looked over at my sister. It was a darker, sturdier fabric than the one he wore at school. That would be my evening hat.

His scent was woodsy and clean. Scarlet kissed me lightly on the cheek so as not to leave a lipstick trace. Her outfit was classic Scarlet: She had also somehow managed to procure a single white lily for her blond hair. He got the time wrong or something.

She stowed her overnight bag in the foyer closet, then put on a smile and went into the living room. Love the hat, Natty. Nana once told me that, in her day, the way we dressed was called vintage. The lights were out, and he was buried under the covers. I gently closed the door behind me and went to join my friends.

By the time we got to Little Egypt, the line to get in extended past the long flight of marble steps that led into the building.

Little Egypt was pretty much the only thing going in this part of town. Scarlet flagged down the bouncer. Pretty please. Red dress. I used to work for your pops. Good man. Daddy had had a lot of enemies but even more friends. Another sign, bolted to the front of the counter, listed admission prices from back when Little Egypt used to be a museum. We traded in our tickets for beers. Why would someone ruin perfectly good water for this? Scarlet shook her head.

She took his hat off his head and placed it on her own. I felt sad for Scarlet because she was using the same move my little sister had.

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